Treats for chicks

Every couple of days I offer to my chicks treats – anything extra that is not they daily food (chicks crumbs).

Their favorite is the scrambled egg. I make a scrambled egg, let it cool down, mash it into small pieces and add 1 tablespoon of cornmeal or grounded rolled oats – prevent pasty butt, 1/4 teaspoon of Sea kelp – reduce the incidence of coccidiosis in baby chicks and 1/4 teaspoon Garlic powder – boosts immune system.

I mix them well together and serve to the chicks

If giving them anything than chicks crumbs, you have to provide them grit, so after giving them “treats” I provide them access to a tray of grit where they also love to scratch, bath and sleep πŸ™‚

Cheesecloth cleaning

Using a homemade cheesecloth to strain my cheese is my favorite, but when it comes to wash it, it was a real adventure.

I tried to use all sorts of soaps, but either remained a pregnant smell of soap on the cloth or the persistent milky smell. Finally I found the right soap to wash my cheesecloth. No smell, just fresh clean cloth.

This is what I use to wash clean my cheesecloth and I’m very content with it, so in case you need a soap that wash well and remove any smell but in the same time doesn’t leave any perfume on the cloth, this is the right one.

Pippin – the rescued chick

As you know I helped a chick come out of its egg. What I did not known back than was that the little one was not a Silkie. It’s egg got through the others eggs by mistake. It is a Bantam (the miniature-type of chicks).

That is why it pipped the egg on day 19, because Bantams chicks come out earlier than the other chicks. But because I did not know it was not a Silkie egg I kept turning all the eggs until day 18, so the pour little thing did not have enough time to position itself in the egg for hatching. That is way he could not brake the egg, it pipped on the wrong place.

I’m glad I could save it. It’s a happy ending story πŸ™‚

Homemade Semi-hard Cultured Cheese

I decided I want to go a bit further with my homemade cheese-making experience and I managed to make a semi-hard cheese.

Nothing complicated in this process, just a little patience – about a week and is done. I used the same process as for making the feta cheese.

I took a small quantity of unsalted feta and put it in a mold and press it down really well until it was almost dry. Then I place the piece of cheese on a rack and let it sit there at room temperature (22-24 Celsius degrees) for about a week, covered with a piece of cheesecloth and turning it 2-3 times a day.

After this period it was done. Absolutely delicious πŸ™‚

Nothing like shop-bought produce. Definitely a winner!

Baby chicks scratching for food

I just love them, they are so adorable πŸ™‚

Previous Older Entries